Every Preemie Partners with Ethiopian Ministry of Health and St. Paul’s Hospital to Improve Programming for Early and Small Babies

Every Preemie website, April 7, 2017ep-cover-story-image

Every year in Ethiopia, more than 300,000 babies are born too soon—less than 37 weeks of gestation. These babies are at increased risk of death, long-term disabilities and ill health later in life. Yet, there are a range of interventions that target women before they are even pregnant and during pregnancy that can prevent preterm birth and, most preterm babies can survive with basic care including drying, warming, immediate and exclusive breastfeeding, hygiene and cord care. Given Ethiopia’s success in reducing deaths among children less than five years old, a higher proportion of under-five deaths are occurring among newborns within the first 28 days of life (29 deaths/1,000 live births). Complications due to preterm birth, infections and breathing difficulties are the top three causes of death among newborns in Ethiopia…

 

Every Preemie Partners with Local Research Institution in India to Study Guidelines for Antenatal Corticosteroids Use

Every Preemie website, March 26, 2017

Complications from preterm birth is the number one cause of death for children under age five around the world – a staggering statistic with one in ten babies born too soon.  India has more preterm births than any other country in the world – over 3.3 million per year – and over 300,000 deaths due to direct preterm complications. The Government of India has taken action to prevent preterm birth and to improve the chances of survival for babies born too soon including publishing operational guidelines in 2014 to direct the use of antenatal corticosteroids (ACS) in health facilities. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends ACS be administered to women who are at risk of early labor between 24-34 weeks of pregnancy to promote lung maturity in the unborn baby. However, ACS can also be harmful when used past 35 weeks of pregnancy – a date which can be difficult to estimate in low-resource settings. We know ACS has the potential to help preterm babies survive, but tailored and context-specific approaches are needed to ensure its safe and effective use…

 

Launch of Network for Improving Quality of Care for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health

The Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health, February 15, 2017

Today, Malawi joined forces with national governments from nine countries to establish a Network for Improving Quality of Care for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health. The Network unites first wave countries (Bangladesh, Cote d’Ivoire, Ethiopia, Ghana, India, Malawi, Nigeria, Tanzania and Uganda) with a high-level political commitment, leadership and readiness for improving quality of care. The aim of the Network is to halve maternal and newborn deaths and stillbirths in participating health facilities in five years. It also aims to operationalise a common vision for Quality of Care —Every mother and newborn receives quality care throughout the pregnancy, childbirth and postnatal periods —through coordinated actions and investments among all stakeholder groups and constituencies….

 

Every Preemie—SCALE Convenes Technical Experts Around Safe & Effective Care of Preterm Babies

PCI’s End Poverty Blog, November 17, 2016

Complication from preterm birth (babies born too soon) is the number one cause of death around the world for children under age five. In the United States, almost one in ten babies is born preterm–the 6th highest rate in the world. Yet, the vast majority of these babies survive while in low-income countries the majority of babies born too soon will not. The difference being that preterm babies in high-income countries receive the care they need to survive and thrive. While we know what works to save preterm babies’ lives, applying this knowledge in low-resource settings can be challenging…

 

Kangaroo Mother Care Endorsed by Major Pediatric, Obstetric, Nursing, and Midwifery Associations

Press Release, Save the Children, November 16, 2016

Representatives of six major US and international health professional associations released an International Policy Statement for Universal Use of Kangaroo Mother Care for Preterm and Low Birthweight Infants at a press event held at the National Press Club in Washington, DC, November 15. The event, timed to coincide with World Prematurity Day, aimed to call attention to the effectiveness of “kangaroo mother care,” or KMC, in improving health outcomes for premature and low birthweight babies…

Joint Statement: International Policy Statement for Universal Use of Kangaroo Mother Care for Preterm and Low Birthweight Infants

 

New WHO Antenatal Care Recommendations: An Important Step Toward Saving Lives, Says Every Preemie

Jim Litch, Judith Robb-McCord, Patrice White – PCI’s End Poverty Blog, November 15, 2016

The World Health Organization (WHO) has released new Antenatal Care Recommendations to help improve care of pregnant women and reduce the risk of stillbirths and pregnancy complications and give women a positive pregnancy experience. Every Preemie-SCALE supports these guidelines as critical steps to saving lives around the world…

 

Every Preemie—SCALE launches multi-country report on antenatal corticosteroid policy and implementation

Judith Robb-McCord – Healthy Newborn Network, July 20, 2016

In June 2016, the USAID-funded Every Preemie—SCALE project, a consortium of Project Concern International (PCI), Global Alliance to Prevent Prematurity and Stillbirth (GAPPS) and American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM), finalized and launched Antenatal Corticosteroids for Women at Risk of Imminent Preterm Birth in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Malawi, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Tanzania and Uganda: A Policy and Implementation Landscape Analysis.  The landscape analysis was conducted on behalf of the Newborn Health Technical Resource Team under the UN Commission for Life-Saving Commodities for Women and Children (UNCoLSC)…

 

Are Preterm and Low Birthweight Babies Treated as a Priority?

La Rue Seims – Every Preemie website, May 30, 2016

The majority of preterm deaths are preventable with good maternal and newborn care.  Recently, we asked ourselves how to determine if the care of preterm and low birthweight babies is prioritized within the countries where we work.  How could we arrive at one condensed and easy-to-grasp measure of whether the needs of these vulnerable newborns were being addressed and whether the situation was changing within the reality of continued inconsistencies and inadequacies in maternal and newborn health care?

 

Midwives Offer Helping Hands to Ensure Early and Small Babies Survive and Thrive

Judith Robb-McCord – PCI’s End Poverty Blog, May 5, 2016

Today, as we celebrate International Day of the Midwife, thousands of families in Malawi recognize and applaud the important contributions midwives have made for improved maternal, newborn and child health. Over the past 15 years and as part of the UN Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), midwives have worked closely with local health care providers and communities to significantly reduce child mortality. Malawi is only one of a handful of countries to boast this achievement. And yet, newborn deaths remain quite high…

 

World Prematurity Day: PCI Convenes Congressional Briefing

Christa Davis – PCI’s End Poverty Blog, December 8, 2015

Each year, 15 million babies are born premature throughout the world, and over a million of them don’t survive. In fact, preterm birth is the number one killer of children under five worldwide. The good news is that most of these lives can be saved with access to information, simple care methods and low-cost interventions. On November 17, World Prematurity Day, our Every Preemie Program hosted a congressional briefing on Capitol Hill to discuss partnerships and initiatives targeting preterm birth around the world…

 

Giving Preemies a Fighting Chance

Judith Robb-McCord – PCI’s End Poverty Blog, November 17, 2015

Today is World Prematurity Day, and this morning I happened to meet a young American family whose son was born eight weeks premature. After six weeks in the hospital, he was sent home where he continued to thrive under his family’s care. Now four months old, he is healthy and bright. Seeing him and the joy he brings to his parents made me think of the millions of families around the world whose preterm babies don’t get the care they need to survive and thrive…

 

Breastfeeding: Babies’ Perfect Food

Judith Robb-McCord – PCI’s End Poverty Blog, August 4, 2015

Breastfeeding is nature’s state-of-the-art nutrition and care for newborns and toddlers the world over. The benefits of exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life are well established. While full-term babies can usually latch on to the breast right away, babies born too early, before 37 weeks of gestation, may need extra breastfeeding support until they are able to nurse on their own. These early babies, or preemies, require extra care and attention to reduce their vulnerability to illness, disability and even death…

 

World Breastfeeding Week: How to Help Your Newborn Grow Up Healthy

Jim Litch – PCI’s End Poverty Blog, July 31, 2015

This is a guest post by Dr. Jim Litch through our Every Preemie – SCALE partnership with the Global Alliance to Prevent Prematurity and Stillbirth. I spent years living and working in rural, mountainous Nepal – a 10 day walk from the nearest road – and one experience has always stood out to me. One morning I was called to the delivery of a baby who was being born much too soon…

 

Huffington Post “Next 10 Challenge”

Judith Robb-McCord – Huffington Post, May 26, 2015

Worldwide, preterm birth is the primary cause of death among children under five, often happening in the first month of life. Fifteen million babies are born early every year, with most of those births occurring in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia…

 

Every Preemie Collaboration to Fight Preterm Birth

PCI’s End Poverty Blog, May 8, 2015

Collaboration is key in our approach to development. That’s why we’re always thrilled to work with partners to solve big problems like preterm birth – which is the #1 cause of death for children under five. Our Every Preemie project is doing just that. Its goal is to seek out and advocate for life saving steps that reduce deaths due to preterm birth…

 

Highlighting the Work of Midwives: IDM 2015 and the Post-MDG Future

Suzanne Stalls – ACNM blog, May 5, 2015

The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) draw to a close this year, and maternal and child health providers have much to reflect on for numbers 4 and 5.  Millennium Development Goal 5 is to reduce maternal mortality by 75%. Unfortunately, the global rate of maternal mortality has been falling annually at less than half of what would be required to achieve the goal…

 

Powerful Cross-Sector Push for Global Action to Prevent Preterm Birth

Healthy Newborn Network, March 2, 2015

In a powerful statement of support for a new push to prevent preterm birth, more than 50 organizations came together in New York City on February 18th, 2015, to discuss the first public-private partnership to prevent preterm birth, with an initial focus on the three countries where one third of all preterm births and an astounding half of all newborn deaths from preterm complications occur – India, Nigeria and Pakistan…

 

Preterm Birth Linked to Intimate Partner Violence during Pregnancy

Judith Robb-McCord – PCI’s End Poverty Blog, December 10, 2014

On Human Rights Day, the global community re-sounded the alarm on the global epidemic of violence against women and girls. The numbers are heart wrenching and an “epidemic” of this nature is entirely unacceptable. While people around the world fear the spread of infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS and Ebola, thousands of women and girls worldwide continue to be the victims of violence and sexual abuse on a daily basis…

 

Taking Action to Save Premature Babies

Judith Robb-McCord – Devex, November 17, 2014

When you ask most Americans what the number one cause of death among children under 5 is worldwide, premature birth isn’t at the top of the list. Yet this year, 15 million babies will be born too soon throughout the world and over 1 million of these babies won’t survive — in fact, most won’t live past the first four weeks of life…

 

PCI Works for Infant Health on World Prematurity Day

Judith Robb-McCord – PCI’s End Poverty Blog, November 13, 2014

Nearly fifteen million babies are born before 37 weeks of pregnancy each year, making them premature and at risk for complications. More than 1 million of these premature babies don’t survive and the difference among countries is staggering: premature babies in low-income countries are more than 10 times more likely to die than those in high-income countries. Prematurity is the leading cause of newborn deaths in the first four weeks of life and the leading cause of death among children under five-years-old around the world. However, 75% of these deaths are preventable through basic care such as warmth, breastfeeding and care for breathing difficulties…